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On view at The Center for Art in Wood, Philadelphia

October 28, 2016–April 8, 2017

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On view at The Center for Art in Wood, Philadelphia

October 28, 2016–April 8, 2017

From multi-axis CNC to laser-cut reliefs and digital joinery, the objects in this exhibition examine the role technology has played in the work of wood artists over the past twenty years. An international cross-section of furniture, sculpture and art objects, Wood, Revisited looks at responses to the increased availability of technology from the perspectives of technique, subject matter, and aesthetics. 

 

PHOTO: COURTESY OF ADRIAAN de GROOT AND FRIEDMAN BENDA, NEW YORK

PHOTO: COURTESY OF ADRIAAN de GROOT AND FRIEDMAN BENDA, NEW YORK

PHOTO: COURTESY OF ADRIAAN de GROOT AND FRIEDMAN BENDA, NEW YORK

PHOTO: COURTESY OF ADRIAAN de GROOT AND FRIEDMAN BENDA, NEW YORK

PHOTO: ADRIEN SEGAL

PHOTO: ADRIEN SEGAL

PHOTO: COURTESY OF ADRIAAN de GROOT AND FRIEDMAN BENDA, NEW YORK

PHOTO: COURTESY OF ADRIAAN de GROOT AND FRIEDMAN BENDA, NEW YORK

 
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That's what technology is bringing us: choices, possibilities, freedoms

Kevin Kelly | Mathematician & Engineer

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That's what technology is bringing us: choices, possibilities, freedoms

Kevin Kelly | Mathematician & Engineer

How have artists adopted new technology and adapted to its increased availability? 

At a moment when artists and designers are encouraged to learn to draw with both pencils and software, it is difficult, if not impossible, for artist, designer, and engineer to remain technologically neutral. Curated by Anne Carlisle with advisement from Glenn Adamson, Wood, Revisited presents a broadly defined territory of processes and concepts bound by a common material. The exhibition moves through junctures where design, mass production and fine art meet, high-lighting the evolving nature of a medium by investigating shifting boundaries of technique, and the play between designer, engineer, and artist.

Wood, Revisited is an exploration of art made possible by new techniques in working with wood. It “revisits” some of the themes that were presented in our 2001 exhibition, Wood Turning in North America Since 1930, which was a collaboration with Yale University Art Gallery. It not only revisits some of the themes presented in that endeavor, but continues the precedent of curatorial mentorship. This website, and the accompanying exhibition catalogue (available for purchase), provide a concise view of some of the ways in which contemporary artists and designers have realized their vision through fabrication methods ranging from traditional wood carving to the cutting edge.

 

we invite you to read more from the exhibition team:

albert lecoff, Co-founder and executive director, the center for art in wood

GLENN ADAMSONEXHIBITION ADVISOR

ANNE CARLISLEproject CURATOR

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My sculpture is the means by which I reconcile conventions of reason and fact with an intuitive and emotive experience.

Adrien Segal | Artist

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In my view, the ideal creative practice (in any medium) mixes craft and concept so completely that they feel like a single, unified act.

Glenn Adamson

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In my view, the ideal creative practice (in any medium) mixes craft and concept so completely that they feel like a single, unified act.

Glenn Adamson

SPECIAL THANKS

Dr. Glenn Adamson has served as adviser to Wood, Revisited, which continues the story that the Center and the Yale University Art Gallery told in Wood Turning in North America Since 1930 (2001). On the recommendation of Dr. Adamson and Elissa Auther, MAD Windgate Research Curator, a promising student was given the same opportunity that Glenn had. Anne Carlisle, a first-year MA student at the Bard Graduate Center, served as the Project Curator for Wood, Revisited.

This exhibition was largely made possible through the generous support of the John and Robyn Horn Foundation and the Center’s Cambium Circle. The documentation on our website and the print-on-demand book was supported by the Center’s Fleur Bresler Publication Fund.

Many thanks to Dan Saal and Erika Brask at StudioSaal Corporation who designed the installation, signage, website and publication. Long-time editor Judson Randall, with copy editor Anne McPeak, coordinated all aspects of the documentation. Center Registrar extraordinaire, Karen Schoenewaldt, oversaw all aspects of the object database, and shipping and handling. With the expert assistance of Matt Giel, Karen also oversaw the placement and installation of all the complex art work.

Thanks also to the Center’s dedicated staff, Fred Kaplan-Mayer; Lori Reece; Katie Sorenson, Rebecca Jacoby, and Morgan LeMaitre for their detailed attention to the daily management of the Center’s programs. Last but not least, thanks to the Center’s Exhibition Committee, Publication Committee and the Board of Trustees for the expertise they lend to all the Center’s work.

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Mel Lindquist once remarked that he would use termites or his teeth, if necessary, to create his work.

Albert LeCoff

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Mel Lindquist once remarked that he would use termites or his teeth, if necessary, to create his work.

Albert LeCoff

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PRESENTING THE FINEST CONTEMPORARY WORKS OF ART IN WOOD

The Center for Art in Wood is the founding arts and educational institution, maintaining the history and leading the growth, awareness, appreciation and promotion of artists and their art in or related to wood.

We welcome everyone from collectors to schoolchildren, and offer a variety of outreach programs.

Visit our website for more info about exhibits and events.

 
 
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We are accelerating together at an incredible pace.

R. Buckminster Fuller

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We are accelerating together at an incredible pace.

R. Buckminster Fuller

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BANNER PHOTO CREDITS, FROM TOP TO BOTTOM:

Ahmed El Husseiny/AE Superlab, The Diwani Chair, 2015 (detail). Atlantic birch plywood. 42 x 31 x 53 in. Courtesy of Ahmed El Husseiny/AE Superlab. 2016.AES.01. Photo: Ahmed ElHusseiny/AE Superlab

Joris Laarman, Maker Chair (Voronoi), 2014 (detail). Walnut. 30 3/4 x 23 5/8 x 25 1/2 in. Courtesy of the Artist and Friedman Benda, New York. 2016.JL.01. Photo: Friedman Benda, New York

Adrien Segal, Molalla Meander, 2013 (detail). Carved plywood. 16 x 46 x 11 in. Courtesy of the Artist. 2016.AS.01. Photo: Courtesy of the Artist

Elisa Strozyk, Wooden Textile, No 1, 2010 (process detail). Apple wood, cherry, beech, maple, silk. 47 1/4 x 70 3/4 in. Courtesy of the Artist. 2016.ES.01. Photo: Courtesy of the Artist

Christopher Kurtz, Singularity, 2013 (detail). Hand carved basswood, milk paint. 81 x 144 w x 36 in. Courtesy of the Artist. 2016.CK.01. Photo: Courtesy of the Artist

Jongrye Cha, Expose Exposed 130915, 2013 (detail). Wood. 44 x 44 x 6 in. Courtesy of Cynthia Reeves Gallery. 2016.JC.01. Photo: Jeong Jinwoo, BauFoto, Courtesy of Cynthia Reeves Gallery

David Nosanchuk, Butterfly Asteroid, 2016 (detail). Beech veneer, bronze, fiberglass, LED illumination. 34 x 36 x 72 in. Courtesy of the Artist. 2016.DN.01. Photo: John Carlano